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>>> this morning, the world wakes to the news that a joint of human and civil rights is gone. nelson mandela, a guiding force, reve revered, forever changing history. >> recognize that apartheid has no future. >> he spent nearly three decades in prison, emerging to become the first black president of south africa. a father figure to his people. and to millions around the world. this morning, new reaction from every corner of the world. >> i cannot fully imagine my own life without the example that nelson mandela set. >> right now on "america this morning," abc news remembers nelson mandela, a man who changed the world. ♪ >>> and this morning, the world wakes to news of a giant of human and civil rights gone. nelson mandela, a guiding force for millions, revered for forever changing history. >> she spent nearly three decades in prison, becoming the first black president in south africa. father figure to millions around the globe. >> people around the world are remembering nelson mandela, a symbol of forbearance, peace and dignity. we have pictures from south africa, where pe
in the civil rights and started hearing about what's going on in south africa, some of the leaders of sclc and others would go. it was considered a terrorist far left kind of course. and it was shunned. people would not discuss it in proper mainstream politics. and mandela was considered somebody who was an extreme cause that was in jail and you would see after awhile it evolved into a movement. but it was -- if it had not been for the randall robinsons and the maxine waters and the others that paid a price that built up a movement, a movement of civil disobedience long before it became a cause and started pushing for sanctions and getting artisan athletes to boycott. had it not been because of that movement, it never would have became the movement it was in the united states. >> the national credibility that was lent to it by having those names you mentioned. and charlayne, as you have covered as a journalist, as an activist, you have known nelson mandela since he has been out of prison. and we know that experience certainly like it would for anybody, it changed him. what people don't und
's incomparable. one of us that grew up in the post-civil rights era it tempered a lot of us that got to know him. the mandela way was not only to fight for change but become the change and he symbolized that in epic proportions. few times i was honored to be around him, you were always moved by this balance of gravity and humility, you never saw in anyone else. he was such a humble and great guy at the same time. it is really something that we probably, president obama said, we'll never see again. >> john meacham, i was talking to my 10-year-old girl about nelson mandela, explaining about him, what he had done, the sacrifices he made, the way he changed this country and the world. i'm wondering, though, of course, my 10-year-old girl didn't know an awful lot about nelson mandela. and we won't even talk about my 5-year-old boy. he'll get it in years to come. what do history books write about this man? >> the last lines of the 20th century. he was arguably with john paul ii, martin luther king, he was someone without whom the world would be radically different and worse. while america mourns him t
of the apartheid foe and civil rights icon, nelson mandela. we continue that, just ahead. ♪ we know we're not the center of your life, but we'll do our best to help you connect to what is. ♪ [ male announcer ] laura's heart attack didn't come with a warning. today her doctor has her on a bayer aspirin regimen to help reduce the risk of another one. if you've had a heart attack, be sure to talk to your doctor before you begin an aspirin regimen. you know that, right? uh-huh. i know this hasn't always been easy for you. and i'm really happy that you're in my life too. ♪ it's just like yours, mom! [ jane ] behind every open heart is a story. tell yours with my open hearts collection at kay jewelers, the number one jewelry store in america. there are millions of reasons to give one, but the message is always the same. keep your heart open... and love will always find its way in. thank you. thank you. ♪ every kiss begins with kay thank you. ♪ feed them natural and healthy blue™ buffalo, like family, featuring lifesource® bits that are now enhanced with our super 7 package of natu
the american years of civil rights struggle, and in those years when he was in prison they felt a connection to him which was completed when he actually came here in 1990. so you can imagine what a wonderful moment that was for him. so it's a special thing for him. there is a service dedicated to nelson mandela at 10:00 ot here this morning. of course they will be remembering him all day and for many years to come. we spoke to the senior pastor here just a little while ago. >> it is awfully difficult to memorialize because a memorial would be life lock for all of us, for the next four, five generations. because a person of his character, a person of his statute and commitment -- stature, will have a clear record of what he's done and i think his life will be much larger and much more impactful, in ten, 15, 15, 20, 25, 30 years now as it has been in the last ten, 15 years. >> they tell me that the night nelson mandela was released from prison in south africa they prayed here at the church all night long and when they got the news that he was released the whole place broke out into cheers. >>
't remember much about the civil rights movement don't remember much about his life. they know what he stood for. i think, you know, today in south africa, even when people wake up in the morning because most people don't know he's transitioned and i use that word because in south africa, people don't talk about death and dying. they talk about transitioning and it's a happy time, and i'm sure they're going to be celebrating his life. i hope they will be teaching, teaching, teaching what nelson mandela stood for. this is a moment to teach. it's a teachable moment. as much as it is a moment to reflect and think about what nelson mandela has meant to the world and to these young people who can sing in that neighborhood where they used to not even be able to go without a pass, the black ones. it's that kind of thing that nelson mandela did away with that we need to remember. those young people could not have gone into that neighborhood a this time of night without a pass before nelson mandela and his people liberated the country. so that's what they're, you know, representing now. >> charlayne,
mandela. how the son of another civil rights icon is help remembering a man who helped end apartheid. 'y and gifts store. anything we purchase for the paper cottage goes on our ink card. so you can manage your business expenses and access them online instantly with the game changing app from ink. we didn't get into business to spend time managing receipts, that's why we have ink. we like being in business because we like being creative, we like interacting with people. so you have time to focus on the things you love. ink from chase. so you can. [ mthat if you wear a partial,w you're almost twice as likely to lose your supporting teeth? try poligrip for partials. poligrip helps minimize stress which may damage supporting teeth by stabilizing your partial. care for your partial. help protect your natural teeth. >>> former presidents george w. bush and bill clinton will join president obama at a memorial for nelson mandela next week as south africa mourns its former president's death. crowds outside his johannesburg home are singing their tributes. ♪ hundreds of people of all ages and co
on the things you love. ink from chase. so you can. >>> poet author and civil rights pioneer maya angelou needs little person son fied. she wrote and had a tribute to nelson mandela. the white house tweeted it out. here is an excerpt. >> his day is done, done. his wings came on a day reluctant to carry his burden. nelson mandela's day is done. no sun out lasts it's sunset but will raise again and bring the dawn. nelson mandela's day is done. we confess it in tearful voices, yet, we lift our own to say thank you, thank you our david, our great courageous man. we will not forget you. we will not dishonor you. we will remember and be glad that you lived among us, that you taught us, and that you loved us, all. >> i spoke with dr. maya angelou shortly before air time. dr. angelou, i watched the poem you wrote and recited and one of the things you struck me, you refer to him as david, not just south africa's david out our david, our david and our giddian. >> a man, a woman we can all be that particular person who has enough courage to stand up and say i am one. i have enough courage to dare to be a
civil disobedience. >> right, and i think the thing that's missing in a lot of this presentation, anderson, is that a lot of south africans died because of the resistant of the apartheid system to integration and liberation of africans in south africa. i think when we think about folks that lost their lives, it's a shameless act of the powers in south africa. one -- there were only 10% of the population but controlled 90% of the population. i think that it's important we talk about this fact, they were fighting a battle trying to end apartheid, trying to make sure everybody could be treated and nelson mandela was a symbol. he said i want everybody to come to the table, everybody to be a part of the new south of ka and everybody to vote. that's why he was elected not as the first african elected but the first democratically elected president of south africa. that's important. democracy and justice ask truth made a big difference. >> robin, i keep coming back to this and mentioned a couple times, i'm fascinated how he began to see himself and it was critical for him to see -- start
at a concert in his honor. meeting with world leaders and his civil rights hero. >> so help me god. >> reporter: as promised, he stepped down as president of south africa after serving just one term. >> south africa has been a despotic state through almost the whole of the 20th century. mandela's legacy stands against it. that is one of the best and most optimistic qualities that he hands to the people of south africa. >> reporter: by all accounts, the measure of this man can be taken by what he wants to be remembered for. here lies nelson mandela said, a man whos has done his duty on earth. >> keith miller reporting. joining us the council on foreign relations richard haas. we talk a lot in vague terms how iconic and important he was. can you somehow crystallize it from a global perspective, his impact? >> just imagine if nelson mandela had been a different kind of person and south africa had gone into a bloody race war in which apartheid didn't end peacefully, but instead, had been a violent transition in which hundreds of thousands of people had died simply because of race. imagine what that
hard. the civil rights movement was hard. giving me women the right to vo, that was hard. making sure we had the right to organize, that was hard. it's never been busy how we do business in this country. >> tony, the president has a wig problem. even with young people with startling statistics out of harvard, they came out with numbers. 39% of so-called millennials, 18 to 29-year-olds, only 39% approve of the affordable care act. 20%, just 20% of those polled intend to enroll. almost half do not intend to enroll. that could be bad news. >> mike, thank you ♪ >> mark morgan is here with the headlines in sports and big news for major college football. >> reporter: the prosecutor looking into sexual assault allegations against florida state quarterback jameis winston said that his investigation is complete, and he will announce his findings tomorrow afternoon. now william meggs said its up to prosecutors if there is enough evidence to charge winston and prosecutors have to decide if they charge is there a reasonable chance of conviction. that announcement is expected tomorrow. meanwhile
at it as almost a proxy for what had happened in america during the civil rights movement and i think it awakened and it was a revelation for many, many americans. >> i'm sure president obama and i'm sure you'll agree was deeply disappointed when he was in south africa earlier this year, with his family, he was not able to go and meet president mandela, because he was so gravely ill. i'm sure he would have loved to have done that, but he obviously couldn't. he'll head to south africa in the coming days for the funeral, this will be an important event not only for president obama but for the united states. >> yes, and again, wolf, mandela has not been himself for a number of years. i think it was understandable he wasn't able to meet with the president. mandela say man of such great pride. the last few years when his memory was failing him, he felt awkward, seeing people, but i do think it's a great opportunity for president obama, president obama has had an important and deep focus on africa, the young african leaders initiative that he started as something that he cares a great deal about, so i
that there is true freedom in forgiveness. >>> joining me now, civil rights leader and president of the rainbow push coalition, reverend jesse jackson. awfully glad to speak with you. you listened to president clinton. do you agree he belongs in the statues of history with gandhi, martin luther king jr. if not maybe at the top of the list? >> external persecution and the wil will, dignity. they were driven by their suffering. you define them by what they did with the pain. that is to say when mr. mandela chose to use his pain for transformation. to use his pain for reconciliation, revenge or retaliation it took him to different level. >> what was it like to be in the same room as he was. oftentimes there are leaders -- and i will say this is applied to you as well. there are some people you think they take up all the energy because there's something about them. he must have had that as well. >> well, he did have a personal magnetism. i remember the first sunday he came out of jail in cape town at south africa at city hall. he walked in the room. having been in jail for 27 years, so aware and so aler
. stateside, a yuounger generatio of american civil rights leaders is reflecting on the legacy of the man and how he inspired them. one of them downing me now from washington, d.c. former president and ceo of the naacp, ben jellis. i'd like to know when nelson mandela first got on your radar. what was the first context in which you learned about him and when you first saw him in person. >> you know, the first conversation was with my mom explaining to me why we couldn't drink coke and we couldn't get gas from the shell station and really talking about how similar the struggle that was happening then in south africa was to what she had gone through as a young person in this country. the first time i saw him was he was doing a tour when he got out of prison. it was 1989. he came to the coliseum in the east bay. i and tens of thousands of people were all gathered there. i recall pushing my way up to the front. you know, for us, we were used to having black leaders assassinated in their prime and spending the rest of our lives wondering what could have been, what would have been. and with him
. ♪ >>> this morning, the world wakes to the news that a joint of human and civil rights is gone. nelson mandela, a guiding force, reve revered, forever changing history. >> recognize that apartheid has no future. >> he spent nearly three decades in prison, emerging to become the first black president of south africa. a father figure to his people. and to millions around the world. this morning, new reaction from every corner of the world. >> i cannot fully imagine my own life without the example that nelson mandela set. >> right now on "america this morning," abc news remembers
. >> it's been an inspiration for generations growing up. he stood for the civil rights, not just people in south africa but people around the world and his legacy goes on. >> reporter: people here continuing to stop to pay their respects. some shedding tears. one note read, quote. thank you for creating a pathway to freedom for all of us, a message that is being heard around the world. michaela? >> thank you, erin. so many felt he was fighting for their freedom as well. freedom from poverty, oppression, whatever. >> i met some kids in south africa that said he is like the madiba. they feel like someone they have a personal connection with and vital to them. >> he was known for visiting dignitaries, he would go around and greet the workers first to shake sure he spent time with them first. >>> in the united states our country's leaders past and present. we heard from president obama last night. let's go to the white house now and hear from brianna keilar. this was a personal moment for barack obama who talked about the influence of nelson mandela when he was a young man. >> reporter: tha
. although he did relax a little bit when i told him about my experience in the civil rights movement, but it brought to mind for him maya angelou, do you know her? talked about how he had -- they had read her work in prison. but then, as i watched him over the years as he spent more and more time in the outside world, he became a little more relaxed and talked more and more about what it was like in prison. and talk more and more about his own vision. he was always a very humble man. he never really -- although he was the leader, he never took credit. for example, when i asked him at a day back in his yard a few days after prison, when everybody thought he was going to be president, do you foresee a time when you will become president of this country? he said, well, you know, that's up to my -- i'm a loyal member of the african national congress and whatever they decide. behind the scene i understand he could rule with a kind of iron hand when necessary. but the face -- his face to the public was always of a genial giant. >> way he comported himself and humility is very genuine descr
>> a retired judge will lead an investigation into a suspected hate crime at san jose state university. civil rights advocate ladoris cordell will head an head an independent task force. members will look into what rules were broken and recommend changes to ensure student safety. four white students are accused of tormenting a black dorm-mate. >> some scary moments for shoppers. about 15 shoppers and workers were hurt when a car smashed into the trader joe's in oceanside, new york. police say an elderly woman lost control of her vehicle and went through the store windows. a witness decribed the >> it came right through the registers, it knocked over all of our registers that's the first thing i saw was the registers being backed up and one of my very close personal friends, i just grabbed her and pulled her out. >> now word on what caused the loss of vehicle control. 12 people were taken to the hosptial -- two of them seriously hurt. >> lane is approaching the bay area and we're even seen snow. here is looks from highway 24. the snow levels are bought 3,000 ft.. and no. we are seen snow down
, this is not right, this cannot stand, we couldn't advance civil rights at home and go through all that we went through, including the martyrdom of martin luther king, who clearly, like gandhi, like mandela, was inspired by gandhi, and not stick up for south africa. >> and you did indeed. he was grateful to you for that. was there one piece of advice that he gave you that really sticks out in your mind? >> yes. when he told me -- he basically was saying, you know if you're in public life and you have public responsibilities, you cannot be free and effective unless you have no personal feelings of anger. he said, you know, you have to -- you have to never give up your mind and heart. it requires a mental and emotional discipline to live in the present and the future, and keep an open door and open mind and an open heart to everyone. i remember one day, oh, about a month after the whole impeachment business was over, henry hyde, who had run the whole show, unbelievably enough, maybe a few months after, it was shortly after, asked for a meeting at the white house, for something that he was interes
of so much history, working with civil rights leaders like reverend jesse jackson, corretja scott king and eleanor holmes norton. mary frann sis berry, the former commissioner of the civil rights commission, eeoc and robinson would transafrica. i was a kid during those days. they were organizing protests outside the south african embassy. my job was to help find and identify people who would get arrested, to keep the movement alive. it was a very tremendous moment and opportunity, but later i had an opportunity, working on a clinton/gore campaign and nelson mandela after visiting harlem in the 1990s, wanted to come to the inaugural of bill clinton. he had great affection and respect and admiration for bill and hillary clinton. i was an advanced person back during those days. i helped to escort him around. my good friend, yolanda, who was in that picture, it was a great moment. later i had an opportunity to go to south africa and other places to help train workers and volunteers who would conduct the first multiracial elections in south africa. he was authentic. he was a giant. you know
or government defendants. thus attorneys' fees provisions are mostly found in civil right, environmental protection and other statutes. the provision in this bill differs from other congressional exceptions in that it would require anyone who loses a patent claim to pay the attorneys' fees of even large corporate defendants. this is a giant deterrent to genuine inventors from filing good-faith suits to defend their valid patents claims. therefore i urge the adoption of the watt-conyers substitute which would drop the losers pays provisions from the underlying bill while still including the key reforms that are present in the underlying bill and in the senate bill drafted by senate -- senator leahy. i urge adoption of the substitute and i yield back the balance of my time. the chair: the gentleman from new york yields back. the gentleman from virginia is recognized. mr. goodlatte: mr. chairman, at this time i'm pleased to yield two minutes to the gentlewoman from california who has been a great person to work with on the judiciary committee and here on the floor of the house on this legis
and the british refer to as "the riot on king street"? >> all right, i know fort sumter was the civil war, and the alamo was somewhere down in texas, and texas wasn't around during the revolutionary war, i don't think, so the burning of washington and the boston massacre. name that shifts the blame. all right, i'm gonna go with... jumping the question 'cause i'm not sure. >> it's my boo. >> [laughter] >> you gonna hit me with my whole move. i was all like, "what are you gonna do? oh, you gonna jump the question." so you jumped over. not really sure, decided to jump over it. >> not really sure, yeah. >> all right, it is now out of play. you thinkin' it was possibly "b," 'cause that's the one you would have, if you would have guessed. >> yes, if i would have guessed. >> what is the correct answer? it is indeed "b," the boston massacre. again, it's double money week. hopefully this money is small. what'd she jump over? oh, well, jumped over $1,000. that's all right. when we come back, clarice is going for her double money question. millionaire in just a second. it's so much more than coffee.
life. >> reporter: president obama paid homage to a civil rights icon. >> let us pause and give thanks for the fact that nelson mandela lived. a man who took history in his hands and bent the mark of the moral universe toward justice. >> reporter: queen elizabeth remembered his efforts. his legacy is the peaceful south africa we see today, she said. a glittering film premiere in london attended by the royal couple and two of mandela's daughters celebrated the movie of his life, "long walk to freedom." his death was announced as the credits rolled. >> extremely tragic news. we are just reminded what an extraordinary man he was. >> reporter: mandela will have a state funeral but it was his leading by example that helped so many. >> we lost one of the most influential, courageous, and profoundly good human beings any of us will share time with here on this earth. he no longer belongs to us. he belongs to the ages. >> reporter: this country is now in an official state of mourning. his body will lie in state for viewing and a funeral is expected. matt, back to you. >> richard, thanks so muc
. >> reporter: i want to get your thoughts as someone who has walked among civil rights giants and nelson mandela, and martin luther king. how aware were the two of them aware to their roles in the struggles? >> dr. king went to jail in '63 and so did nelson mandela. dr. king in his address referenced the struggle in south africa. the kinship from the american corporations and south africa and our government that was a part of it. also the things that we did here enabled mandela's freedom. for example, the '65 riots act that changed the course in this country. blacks could vote for the first time in the south and women could vote and you could vote on campuses and bilanguagebilangua. it clouded the sanctions on south africa led by congressman randell o. it seems to me our struggle and their struggle coincided very well. >> reporter: we appreciate your thoughts on this day, remembering nelson mandela. thank you. >> i'll see you before the week is over. >> reporter: all right. look forward to it. let's head back to new york now and erica. >> lester, thanks. >>> we want to turn to encour e
's about civil rights. >> dave? >> this is the mood certainly in maryland and parts of the you state to be more welcoming, more open, gay marriage, the revolution and thinking on gay people and people who have other issues in that regard -- not issues, but transgenders, people like that. just another move in the direction. hyattsville today could be a lot of other cities tomorrow. >> i tend to agree. i don't think there's -- it's notable that this step has been taken. but unless it leads to a larger, more broader sort of conversation about discrimination generally, it may just be something localized. this is the kind of thing i expect out of tacoma park. surprised that hyatts vilville took -- >> i like people that call it park. >> discrimination is discrimination. >> dave mcconnell, jerry. thank you for being with us. i'm pat lawson muse. that's it for reporter's notebook. news 4 today continues. >>> we're keeping close watch on a winter storm. a live look over the potomac river right now at 6:30, courtesy of our camera at national harbor. even though it's along the water, it's one o
of guerrilla leaders in civil wars anywhere who just hate the opposition, right? you see that in syria today but he managed not to let that pull him down but to just focus on changing the system and not hating the people. jon: tom carver covered the end of apartheid in south africa for the bcc. he talked to nelson mandela a couple of types. tom, thank you for sharing those thoughts. >> you're welcome. >> some new details emerging from the investigation into the tragic death of paul walker. police now making an arrest in what they say that these two men stole from the scene of the crash and how they found out about it. we'll get you up-to-date on that. >>> also the white house says the obamacare website now works for most americans. why problems with the site can lead to a nasty surprise for some people who think they signed up for insurance. every day we're working to be an even better company - and to keep our commitments. and we've made a big commitment to america. bp supports nearly 250,000 jobs here. througall of our energy operations, we invest more in the u.s. than any other place in t
think mats comply civil underway, a to does not answer to work is going on right now. there's a question in the significant issues are in the midwest due to a variety of factors. in addition to rely on the midwest, the midcontinent iso in the states we need to stay closely involved. >> do you feel like epa is listening to you on these issues because i do because in 2011 when they put out their rule, they include a consultative role for ferc if someone needs a fifth year. i believe that includes not just a fifth year for retrofit but also -- and not just for retrofit but also as they need to figure to bring transmission and before the plan can retire. we voted out a policy statement of how we would handle those. we haven't gotten them yet because it's not far enough along in the process. >> they tell us they're listening to us a lot. sometimes we don't think they are. >> i am very grateful that it comes all the meetings and i'vee a commitment from them that they will continue. but it's something that needs close vigilance. >> i was going to ask you about your priorities. i felt like mr. w
or throat, or difficulty breathing or swallowing, stop taking cialis and get medical help right away. ask your doctor about cialis for daily use and a 30-tablet free trial. >> health care manufacturer johnson & johnson will pay to sell civil allegations. >> i expect this from you, johnson, but not you, johnson. to be honest, i have not trusted johnson & johnson since i tried to stop my child's crying with the no more tears shampoo in his eyes. did not work. >> the 113th hasn't passed the bills every congress does like a highway bill or defense bill or farm bill or a budget. what do we need a budget for? clearly not for highways, defense, or food. congress did pass a bill ensuring that people can fish near dams on the cumberland river and also passed deep cuts in food stamps if are the poor which is good solid governing because the poor don't need food stamps anymore now that they can fish near dams on the coupler withland river. >> time to talk about what we learned. we learned a lot. i learned you can catch a munch kin in your mouth if it is delivered right. >> it's not good. really bad
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)